Sleep scientist says sleeping with a snoring partner could improve relationships

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Sleep scientist says sleeping with a snoring partner could improve relationships

Sleeping in separate rooms with a snoring partner could improve relationships rather than marking the end, a leading sleep scientist has said.

As a result, couples can enter the beginning of a new relationship where they are well rested and, ideally, happy, according to Russell Foster, a professor of circadian neuroscience at the University of Oxford and director of the Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology.

Foster said earplugs are not the only solution for a snoring partner. How do you sidle up to people and say, What can I do? I slept with my partner for 50 years, it s the end of our relationship No, it isn t. It s the beginning of a new relationship where both of you ideally would be healthier, more responsive to each other, less impulsive, less irritable, so I don t think you should be afraid to sleep in an alternative sleeping space if you have one. Foster said it is important to visit a doctor to make sure that snorers don't have obstructive sleep apnoea, which is one of the most common causes of snoring and can be dangerous if left untreated.

He also offered other tips for sleeping better, such as deleting sleep apps from phones and using trackers, which can alleviate anxiety surrounding sleep and enhance the overall quality.

They re okay to tell you how you slept, if you woke up in the night and when you finally got up. It s just nonsense when they start saying, You had a good night s sleep, you got lots of REM sleep it s just nonsense.

He added that getting morning light is also important for the body's circadian rhythm. People's circadian rhythm, or body clock, responds to light, so by getting outside during the day, it can help them be more alert.