Rehabilitation of Kampala-Malaba Railway Line Nearing Completion

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Rehabilitation of Kampala-Malaba Railway Line Nearing Completion

The rehabilitation of the $301 million Kampala-Malaba metre gauge railway line is close to completion, with 95% of the work already done, according to the Chinese Railway and Bridge Cooperation (CRBC), the contractor for the project. The project, financed by the African Development Bank Group, commenced in February and is projected to be finished soon. The railway is an integral part of the Northern Corridor of the East African Community, which aims to improve railway services and decrease transportation expenses.

The first phase of the rehabilitation included the design of the Kampala multimodal hub and the refurbishment of the Kampala-Namanve and Tororo-Malaba sections, totaling 28 kilometers. The second phase covered the Environmental Study and Impact Assessment, procurement of workshop equipment and rolling stock, and the rehabilitation of various sections totaling 245km. The railway, which connects Kampala to the Port of Mombasa in Kenya, is expected to improve rail services and decrease transportation costs.

The first phase of the rehabilitation involved the engineering design for the Kampala multimodal hub and the restoration of the Kampala-Namanve and Tororo-Malaba sections, amounting to 28 kilometers. The second phase included the Environmental Study and Impact Assessment, purchase of workshop equipment and rolling stock, as well as the rehabilitation of Namanve-Tororo, Port Bell line, Jinja Pier line, and Kampala-Kyengera sections totaling 245km. The railway, part of the Northern Corridor of the East African Community connecting Kampala to the Port of Mombasa in Kenya, aims to enhance rail services and reduce transportation costs.

Qin Jian, a CRBC engineer, mentioned that the rehabilitation is 95% complete, with the remaining 5% to be finished on schedule in February. John Sengendo, a senior public relations and communication officer at the Uganda Railways Corporation, noted measures to prevent vandalism, including the employment of permanent inspectors and the installation of sensors to detect broken points on rails.